The science behind Mona Lisa’s smile.

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The science behind Mona Lisa’s smile.

Like think of themselves as leonardo Da Vinci painting and engineering as well, although it isn’t true (no portrait painting as good at engineering), but his creativity is the basis of enthusiasm interweave different disciplines. He is a fan of the playful and obsessive, devoted to the innovative study of anatomy, mechanics, art, music, optics, birds, hearts, aircraft, geology and weapons. He wanted to know everything that might be known. Crossing the intersection of art and science is the most creative genius in history.

His science tells his art. He studied the human skulls, made pictures of bones and teeth, and sent st. Jerome’s skeletal pain in the wilderness. He explores the mathematics of optics, showing how light enters the eye and creates a phantasmagorical fantasy of changing visual angles in the “last supper”.

The biggest victory he combined with art, science, optics and illusion was the smile of the Mona Lisa, who started working in 1503 and died 16 years later. He dissected the face, painted the muscles of the moving lips, and combined the knowledge with the science of retinal processing perception. The result is a masterpiece, inviting and responding to human interaction, making leonardo’s virtual reality pioneer.

The magic of Mona Lisa’s smile is that it seems to react to our gaze. What was she thinking? She laughed mysteriously. Watch it again. Her smile seemed to flash. We sweep away, the mysterious smile is like in the collective heart of mankind. In other paintings, movement and emotion are the twin touchstones of leonardo’s art.

Modern contemporary artist George Vasari, Giorgio Vasari tells the story of leonardo Da Vinci how to retain a Florentine silk merchant’s young wife Lisa DE gonow kondo (Lisa del Giocondo) in the portrait of her smile at the meeting. “While drawing, he also employed people to sing for her, to keep her happy, and to end the melancholy of the portraits that painters often succeeded in giving them.” As a result, vasari said, “the smile is so pleasant that it is more sacred than human beings” and claims that it is the product of a superhuman skill directly from god.

This is a classic Vasari cliche, which is misleading. In the Mona Lisa smile from some divine intervention is not. Instead, it is a product of many years of painstaking research involving the use of scientific human effort and artistic skill. Using his knowledge of technology and anatomy, leonardo produced an optical impression that made the feat possible. In the process, he showed the most profound examples of creativity from embracing art and science.

Leonardo tried to shape the effect of the Mona Lisa, starting with the planks. He painted a layer of lead-white primer, not just a mixture of chalk and paint, on a thin sheet of wood that had been cut from the trunk of poplar trees. He knew that this background color would better reflect light from his delicate translucent glaze, thus enhancing the impression of depth, luminosity and volume.

Some light penetrating the paint layer reaches the white primer and is reflected back through the same layer. Therefore, our eyes see the interaction between the light reflected from the surface and the light bouncing back from the depth of the picture. This creates a shift and an elusive subtlety.The Outlines of lisa’s cheeks and smiles are created by pastel transitions that appear to be covered with glaze, and they change with the light in the room and the Angle of our gaze. The picture brightened up.

Leonardo, like the 15th century Dutch painter Van Van Eyck, used a small amount of glaze in the mixture. Leonardo’s unique method is to apply the glaze to a very small brush, and then apply it very slowly, for months or even years, to apply an extra coating on the thin layer. This allows him to create a three-dimensional form, showing subtle layers in the shadows and blurring the boundaries of objects in a fuzzy way. His strokes are so light and layered that many personal touches are hard to detect.

Leonardo, like the 15th century Dutch painter Van Van Eyck, used a small amount of glaze in the mixture. Leonardo’s unique method is to apply the glaze to a very small brush, and then apply it very slowly, for months or even years, to apply an extra coating on the thin layer. This allows him to create a three-dimensional form, showing subtle layers in the shadows and blurring the boundaries of objects in a fuzzy way. His strokes are so light and layered that many personal touches are hard to detect.

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