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Migrant workers leave clues to the post-depression lifestyle.

A group of archaeologists in the Pennsylvania delta are trying to humanize one of the most marginalized groups in history.

They have been excavating the great depression camps where workers move from one place to another to find work. Archaeologists are exploring what used to be known as the “tramp jungle”, says Daniel Sayers, head of anthropology at the university of American anthropology and co-director of mining.

“What we usually focus on is something that people tend not to be concerned about,” Sayers said in the morning edition of NPR. “This is what we leave behind, this is garbage, this is what we use everyday, this is where we create it – we do it where we reflect ourselves.

Migrant workers is not famous, so Sayers and his colleagues were surprised many hobby items, including the mandolin and they think the board game, from local found carved by hand on the stone. They also found a fire pit, metal canister, a frying pan, ceramic, mason jar and medicine bottle.

Anthropologists have discovered that 100 years old graffiti “America’s most famous tramp”

Art and life

Anthropologists have discovered that 100 years old graffiti “America’s most famous tramp”

This tells them that people living in this camp may have a close family community, though people will come and go.

Doctoral candidate at the university of the United States Justin yuri grace (Justin Uehlein) is an American university, deputy director of another, he said, understanding these camps in People’s Daily life can help us to rethink the way today’s immigrants and migrant workers, a lot of shame.

“They are simple phrases like” emigration “or” job hunting “. These very short phrases don’t tell you who these people are and why they are forced into it. ”

Indiana Jones, which meets old beer and extreme drinks.

salt

Indiana Jones, which meets old beer and extreme drinks.

Teenagers excavate black history as city archaeologists.

All over the country

Teenagers excavate black history as city archaeologists.

Sayers and Uehlein hope that their work on archaeology since 2016 will draw attention to the system of exploiting migrant workers, rather than blaming the workers themselves. They were inspired by the nature of the community seen in the camp ruins.

Sayers, said: “I think, when we begin to pay close attention to the marginalized communities, we will see different community organization form, the different forms of community organization form, the different ways people help each other. “This is not the basic relationship between the number of X I work for you, and you sell the products I produce to make more money, not pay me.” We can see a range of options. ”

Researchers from the American university say that’s what’s left of a remote community like this. They have identified several other sites they want to mining, including Washington, d.c., some of the sites, and that these projects both for today’s American society criticism, also provides inspiration for it.

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